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Paul M. D'Amore
Paul M. D'Amore

Founding Member, Trial Lawyer

Maryland’s Biggest Fear

Maryland’s Biggest Fear Revealed In Time For Halloween

Last year, creepy clowns were among Americans’ top fears. Guess what folks in Maryland are most scared of this year…

According to an article by the Annapolis Patch, there’s no lack of things to be scared of, from personal safety to politics to the health of your family and distracted or enraged drivers. But the biggest fear in Maryland is an understandable one, according to a home security company’s analysis of Google search data on creepy, frightening things.

This year, YourLocalSecurity.com says it refined its methodology and analyzed data from Google’s autocomplete feature to find the 15 most common ways to end phrases like “why am I afraid of/to” and “why am I scared of/to.” Marylanders, it seems, suffer from anthrophobia, a morbid fear of social situations, according to the list.

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More Blog Posts

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National Teen Driving Safety Week: What Parents And Teens Should Know

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Concussions Are More Dangerous Than We Think

The prevalence of concussions among young athletes has seen a concerning spike in recent years. Brainline recently reported a study that concluded 3.8 million concussions were suffered as a direct consequence of sports in the United States last year.  The report also estimated that 50 percent of these cases probably went unreported and, therefore, were never treated.