Firm News & Events arrow Supervised Underage Drinking

Paul M. D'Amore
Paul M. D'Amore

Founding Member, Trial Lawyer

Supervised Underage Drinking

If you're celebrating the end of the year or graduation with your teen, it might be tempting to allow them to toast the occasion with you. However, even supervised underage drinking is illegal and dangerous.

Watch Paul D'Amore on Midday Maryland discuss how even supervised underage drinking can land you into hot water.

Alex and Calvin's Law was named after Alexander Murk and Calvin Li, who lost their lives in a car accident after a party where alcohol was served by an adult. Now, an adult who provides alcohol to a minor (regardless of relationship) and who allows that minor to operate a vehicle, faces up to 1 year in prison and up to $5,000 in fines for each offense if that minor causes serious physical injury or death to his/her self or another.

Additionally, two Maryland appeals court decisions made it clear that providing alcohol to minors creates civil liability for the adult if the minor is harmed or harms a third party. So, if parents serve alcohol to minors at a house party or turn a "blind eye" to obvious alcohol consumption, they risk financial responsibility for any harm caused to the children or that the children cause to a third party.

Even if the teens aren't driving, alcohol damages teens still-developing brains.

More Health Posts

Surgical Robots Can Be Risky: Here’s What Patients Need To Know

The da Vinci surgical system is believed to be a one-of-kind medical breakthrough in the field of robotic-assisted surgery. Assisting in more than six million procedures to date, the da Vinci allows surgeons to perform high-risk procedures with minimally invasive methods. Manufacturers of the da Vinci claim it could one day change the landscape of all surgery, reducing the number of complications leading to life-threatening injuries. 

Carbon Monoxide: How To Prevent The ‘Silent Killer’

Carbon monoxide is a toxic gas that has been heavily studied since the late 1200s. Researchers say Spanish alchemist Arnold of Villanova first discovered the poisonous gas when examining the incomplete combustion of wood. According to historical records, Villanova described an invisible poisonous gas that scientists today believe was most likely the existence of carbon monoxide fumes. 

Paul D'Amore Discusses the Flu on Midday Maryland

There have already been of 100 cases of confirmed flu here in Maryland, but it's not too late to get your shot.